Dave over at Communication Nation, picked up on an interesting point saying,

Stop searching for God and just sit!

You know it strikes me as interesting that when businesses want to see more innovation, they talk about creativity. They hold workshops on how to be creative. But when you talk to most creative people — like artists, inventors, and yes, bloggers — they don’t talk about creativity, they talk about process.

Is it possible that the reason we creative types talk about processes is because once the processes are taken care of, we have more time to spend dreaming – hence more time to spend being creative?

3 comments

  1. I tend to agree and disagree. On one hand we need process to enable people less creative and more methodical to create. On the other hand dreaming or imagination is very important for creativity because we know that not always do process yield results. A simple example of pharma industry, they are highly process oriented in thier research for new molecules or new drugs. So if thier processes were yielding, then today’s world would have been a disease free world.

  2. Nag, I guess the processes in the Pharma industry are much more regulated as compared to maybe the advertising industry – any “new” idea that is introduced in the pharma industry need to go through a gamut of tests and reviews before it can be released to the general public for mass consumption – the risk of no complying with those procedures is too high.

    Processes are enabling to some extent – but obviously, process alone doesn’t solve any problems!

    Thanks for leaving a comment here – the Pharma industry would be a good case to review in terms of process and innovation.

  3. The true innovation resides in the minds of individuals not processes . Processes are created by business to improve efficiency . One needs to break free of such processes and collaborate with other individuals to innovate .

    One of the places i found on interenet where one could do this is called unstructure .

    Check it at http://www.unstructure.org

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